Detailed factsheets
Detailed factsheets

A first batch of detailed waste prevention factsheets was uploaded here during the European Week for Waste Reduction between 19 and 27 November 2011.

In the following weeks some 50 Good Practice factsheets will be available here.

Each PDF factsheet presents on about 7 pages: the local context, how the action was implemented, resources used, results obtained, recommendations and similar actions elsewhere.

Among these 50 cases some 27 have been identified as best practices.

The German county Schweinfurt adopted Pay-As-You-Throw System that takes into account 3 aspects: bin volume, collection frequency and weight. In this way, there is an up-front choice to be made to reduce bin volume, an incentive to reduce set-out rates (so as to improve collection logistics) and a weight-based element to reflect the marginal benefits of avoided disposal. In Schweinfurt, the system's performance has been outstanding. An already high-performing system was made more so by the application of an intelligently designed PAYT charging scheme. The rigour with which the system was contemplated, prepared, implemented, and then monitored demonstrated a high…

Description: Brussels Environment has established Waste Management and Prevention Plans since 1992. In its 4th Waste Management plan published in 2010 it includes for the first time quantitative objectives for each waste flow with a rationale on how to achieve them. The figures are based on the amount of waste gerated (per waste stream) in 2005, the reduction potential (calculated based on pilot projects) and expected participation of the population. Objectives are set for 2013 and/or 2020.

These objectives have for instance been set

  • in kg/inhabitant/year for food wastage by households, paper wastage by households, packaging reduction at household level, reduction of household consumption of certain products and disposable nappies, garden waste;
  • in % for the collection and return to the market of reusable goods and bulky waste;
  • in kg/worker/year for the workplace and in kg/pupil/year for schools concerning paper waste, packaging and food wastage in schools.

Example: Reduce food wastage by households by 2 kg/inhabitant by 2013 and by 5kg/inhabitant  by 2020(= 5.000T)

For the full detail of the quantitative objectives and the underlying calculations, please refer to Annex II (p.66-68) of the Waste plan at the URL below.

(Factsheet attached)

Full plan available in English via: www.bruxellesenvironnement.be/pre-waste
in French or Dutch via: www.bruxellesenvironnement.be/Templates/Particuliers/informer.aspx?id=3964&detail=tab3

The main objective of the eco-tax on bags is to gather extra income for the Environmental Fund and at the same time to reduce the demand for plastic bags on the market. This is done by imposing a 0,2 RON (0.04 Euro) for each bag made from non-biodegradable materials that is introduced on the market. The producer has to pay this sum for every bag introduced on the market, regardless of its size or quality. What matters is whether or not the bag is made from biodegradable materials.More information about this good practice

In Germany, Austria, and Switzerland different regulations have been put into place to ban the use of disposable food and drink containers at large scale events and to establish a framework for the use of reusable crockery.

Description of one-way ban in Munich: On public land, since 1991, a by-law of the city of Munich forbids the use and sale of disposable tableware, cups, but also drink packaging on land owned by the city.

This obligation applies to all city facilities and events, such as the Munich-based weekly markets in the Olympic Stadium and Munich's Oktoberfest.

The forbidden disposable items are replaced by reusable ones for which consumers pay a deposit that they get back when they return the items. This action significantly reduces the waste generated by events like the Christmas market, Auer-Dult Faire, Oktoberfest and Munich City Marathon.

Also, for smaller-scale events (200-300 people), the City of Munich cooperates with MobielSpiel e.V offering the possibility to rent a crockery and dishwasher equipment. The City of Munich also promotes returnable bottles for beverages.

Results: The positive results of waste prevention measures can be demonstrated with numbers: the volume of waste at these events between 1991 and 2004, fell by more than 50 percent.Waste generated during the Oktoberfest (beer festival), attracting tens of thousands of people from all over the world, was reduced from 11,000 tonnes in 1990 to 550 tonnes in 1999. Since this event is based on a strong ecological concept, it received the “Eco- Oscar” award by the Federal Government of Germany in 1997.

Years : in force since 1991 and since replicated by other cities.

In Sweden, it is estimated that about a quarter of all food purchased never gets eaten, but is thrown away. This means unnecessary production and often long transportation, leading to a waste of raw material and energy. A fifth of all food consumed in Sweden, e.g. 1.4 bn. portions, is consumed within the so called hospitality sector (hotels, restaurants/canteens and catering). One of the actors - Eurest Services - runs restaurants at private companies, universities and schools all over Sweden. They have 120 restaurants with approximately 60.000 meals served every day. More information about this good practice

Since 1993, the IBGE legally requires regional public administrations to take into account a series of environmental and waste management considerations in their procurement decisions and office management. These requirements are consistent with those at national and European level.

The IBGE follows the implementation of the regional legal texts (circulars) by supervising and supporting the administrations concerned. It provides informative web pages, a help desk (via email), training sessions, technical guides, examples of specifications and awareness raising tools like posters and videos.

The first regional ministerial circular for eco-consumption and waste management (8 July 1993) focused on paper, hazardous waste, and general waste. It called for the promotion of eco-consumption within the administration, awareness raising among its staff and the allocation of sufficient resources (including staff time).

Regarding waste prevention it called for:
- reduction in the quantity of paper waste by fostering a more rational use (printing only the quantity needed, double-sided printing, print-preview, circulating and centralising documents, become acquainted with the content of a document rather than taking a copy…)
- reduction of the quantity of hazardous waste by buying environmentally friendly office products (writing materials, glues, correcting fluids, inks, batteries, toners…)
- promotion of reuse of equipment and products

The main objectives of the Self Service Detergents Project is to reduce packaging waste production coming from the purchase and use of detergents through the diffusion of the sale of on-tap detergents in retail chains in Piemonte making use of reusable bottles. The project addressed the bulk sale of detergents such as dish-washing liquids, fabric conditioners, laundry liquids, and all- purpose cleaners. The project was a collaboration between th Piemonte region, the retail sector (GDO), and detergent producers. Detergent dispensers were placed in over 40 points of sale. 74% of detergent purchases at the dispensers involved re-using the bottle. As…

The NU savings programme is an incentive system for sustainable purchasing behaviour by consumers implemented in Roterdam (2000-2003). The logic behind the NU-Spaarpas is the desire to influence behavior by affecting the movement of goods, services and money rather than the systems of production of goods and services. It is based on a loyalty smartcard which enables customers to earn points through sustainable behavior and when buying consumer products at participating stores.

Concretely, card-holders who buy goods or services at one of the entities participating in the project receives NU points per € spent. In addition, they receive points for sustainable behaviours, such as returning separatly collected waste. Goods and services identified as envirtonmentally friendly - such as organic produce, products with a fair-trade label or second hand clothes - award 4 times more per € spent than the others. In the store the points are uploaded on the card by means of a terminal and a scanner to read the product-specific bar-code. The points can be exchanged against gifts in the participating stores and against ‘green’ services (such as a public transport pass or entries to a museum), or given to charity.

Brussels Environment is currently implementing a similar incentive scheeme at pilot scale (2012-2013):
EcoIris complementary currency - information in French

In the Brussels Capital Region, 54% of jobs are administrative. Despite new office technologies, large quantities of paper are still used.  The dematerialisation project involved - coaching of a series of organisations during 3 to 6 months focusing on training & awareness raising, new tools, improved document flow… - region-wide communication campaigns including free information sessions and tools. Since 2002, three coaching phases were implemented during each of which 10 to 25 voluntary companies were accompanied, each followed by a region-wide campaign. Quantitative results: 15% to 25% reduction in paper consumption achieved in 25 coached companies (average 18%). More information…

In the Brussels Capital Region, 54% of jobs are administrative. Despite new office technologies, large quantities of paper are still used. 

The dematerialisation project involved

- coaching of a series of organisations during 3 to 6 months focusing on training & awareness raising, new tools, improved document flow…

- region-wide communication campaigns including free information sessions and tools.

Since 2002, three coaching phases were implemented during each of which 10 to 25 voluntary companies were accompanied, each followed by a region-wide campaign.

Quantitative results:

15% to 25% reduction in paper consumption achieved in 25 coached companies (average 18%).